Library and Archives

September 1, 2020

Versos y Besos: The Anthrophony of Manuela Garcia

Collections / Latinx Communities / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Suzanne Garcia, Director, Las Colibri Mariachi Ensemble and Marissa Lopez, Professor of English and Chicana/x Studies, UCLA

This weekend, as protests roil the U.S. and the country is called to account for its history of systemic racism and violence against people of color, we are proud to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Chicano moratorium against the Vietnam War. On this historical day, Las Colibrí is proud to premiere “Versos del Alba,” a live recording and interpretation of lyrics taken from the 1901 journal of Manuela C. García.

García was a... Read more

August 24, 2020

Invisible Labor: The Telling is Easy

Collections / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Christina Lehua Hummel-Colla, Library Collections Assistant

“Whether she walked a short way or a long way, the telling is easy, but the journey was hard.”

—Vasilisa the Beautiful, Russian Fairy Tales

The first thing my colleagues and I noticed about the Mole Poblano recipe that Señora Librado Garcia contributed to Comidas Mexicanas is its brevity. Nine ingredients. Four lines of instructions. Having never prepared a mole before, I tried to start my work earlier in the evening, intending to have a good... Read more

August 17, 2020

The Suffrage Stories Connected Through the Archives

Collections / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Victoria Bernal, Women in the Archives Social Media Manager

To celebrate the centennial of the 19 th Amendment, the Autry launched a year-long campaign to draw attention to the women’s stories found in the archives (#ArchivingWomen). With the 100th anniversary upon us, this is a small sampling of suffrage stories spread throughout different archive collections, including collections found at the Autry.

In the book Contesting Archives: Finding Women in the Sources , Sherry Katz explained her process of having to “research around other subjects” in order to piece... Read more

August 3, 2020

Comidas Mexicanas: Sharing Multicultural Foodways

Exhibitions / Latinx Communities / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Christina Hummel-Colla, Library Collections Assistant

It is no surprise, given that I was born and raised in Los Angeles, that Mexican American food has always occupied a special place in my heart and stomach. When I left to study abroad in Saint Petersburg, Russia, I packed a bottle of hot sauce to ensure that I would have a flavor to remind me of home. All this to say, I was delighted when my colleagues and I began to explore... Read more

July 17, 2020

Roam From Home With Caroline Boeing Poole and Other Women Wanderers

Collections / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives
By Victoria Bernal, Women in the Archives Social Media Manager

I have a wonderful wild free feeling lurking within me, as we speed along! I want to get off at every station & go out into this country which I know so well.

—Caroline Boeing Poole writing about a train trip to Santa Fe, New Mexico (1930-1931)

Since many will “roam from home” during these summer months, we’re sharing a few pages from the 1930s travel diary of Caroline Boeing Poole (1882-1932) and other women travelers, which not only transport one... Read more

June 22, 2020

Digitizing a Century of Native Voice and Song at the Autry

Collections / Library and Archives / Native Communities

By Yuri Shimoda, CLIR Recordings at Risk Intern, Autry Museum of the American West

In September 2018, the Autry received a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Recordings at Risk grant to digitize hundreds of Native American songs, oral histories, field recordings, plays, and lectures captured on sound and audiovisual media from 1898 to 2007. The recordings were made across such a vast period of time that there were many different formats that needed to be digitized – from open reel tape, wire, and four types of discs to audiocassettes, CDs, and VHS tapes.

... Read more

May 29, 2020

Manuela Garcia Sings: Now Streaming

Collections / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Liza Posas, Head, Research Services and Archives

“Manuela Garcia was Charles Lummis’s most important informant. She had a repertoire of songs that surpassed 200 or 300 in number and she recorded about 110 for Charles Lummis.” —Ethnomusicologist, Dr. John Koegel, in an interview by Huell Howser on a “lost episode” of the California Gold television series, 1996

“Miss Manuela C. Garcia of Los Angeles” sang over 100 Spanish language songs for Charles Fletcher Lummis between 1904 and 1905, which he recorded on to wax cylinder. These recordings became part of... Read more

May 8, 2020

The Webster Women: Mother & Daughter Kept Together Through the Archives

Collections / Library and Archives / Revealing Women in the Archives

By Victoria Bernal, Women in the Archives Social Media Manager; Caroline Sheehan, 2018-2019 Autry/Occidental College intern; and Liza Posas, Head of Research Services and Archives

On this Mother’s Day, we explore the archives of Edna Robb Webster, American author, poet, and historian of Mayan culture. Her archives were lovingly preserved by her daughter Marjorie Ellen Webster before she donated them to the Autry.

Edna travelled to Mexico’s Yucatan region in the early 20 th Century making her one of the first women explorers of are—which she vividly captured in photographs... Read more

May 5, 2020

Exploring old Los Angeles with the Pico House Register, June 1870 – May 1872

Collections / Library and Archives

By Marva Felchlin, Former Director Autry Library and Archives; Cheryl Miller, Head Library Metadata and Discovery Services

Pio de Jesus Pico was born at Mission San Gabriel on May 5, 1801. The son of soldier José María Pico, Pio Pico was of mixed African, American Indian, and European heritage. He moved to San Diego in 1819, where he kept a small shop. Pico served in the Mexican government of Alta California in the 1830s and 1840s. He became governor of California in 1845, but his term ended abruptly when the United States annexed California in 1846. Pico fled to Mexico during the... Read more

April 21, 2020

Safety First With Roy Rogers and Dale Evans

Collections / Library and Archives

By Mallory Furnier, former Autry Project Archivist

Many Roy Rogers and Dale Evans promotions revolved around their licensed merchandise, though not every publicity bonanza centered on branded products. Rogers and Evans also made their name as champions of a variety of charities. Beginning first in the late 1940s, the Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Safety Slogan Contest and School Safety Awards encouraged schools and individual students to consider safety issues and prevent accidents. It is unclear when the contests ended and how much they overlapped, but both appeared with regularity until... Read more