California State Content Standards


Life in the West: Plains Indians
History Social Science

2nd Grade

2.1 Students differentiate between things that happened long ago and things that happened yesterday.

3rd Grade

3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and use maps, tables, graphs,
photographs, and charts to organize information about people, places, and environments in a
spatial context.
3.1.2 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline).
3.2 Students describe the American Indian nations in their local region long ago and in the
recent past.
3.2.1 Describe national identities, religious beliefs, customs, and various folklore traditions.
3.2.2 Discuss the ways in which physical geography, including climate, influenced how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment (e.g., how they obtained food, clothing, tools).

5th Grade

5.1 Students describe the major pre-Columbian settlements, including the cliff dwellers and
Pueblo people of the desert Southwest, the American Indians of the Pacific Northwest, the
nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River.
5.1.2 Describe how geography and climate influenced the way various nations lived and adjusted to the natural environment, including locations of villages, the distinct structures that they built, and how they obtained food, clothing, tools, and utensils.
5.1.3 Describe their varied customs and folklore traditions.


Life in the West: Cowboys
History Social Science

Kindergarten

K.1 Students understand that being a good citizen involves acting in certain ways.
K.1.1 Follow rules, such as sharing and taking turns, and know the consequences of breaking them.
K.6 Students understand that history relates to events, people, and places of other times.
K.6.3 Understand how people lived in earlier times and how their lives would be different today (e.g., getting water from a well, growing food, making clothing, having fun, forming organizations, living by rules and laws).

1st Grade

1.2 Students compare and contrast the absolute and relative locations of places and people and
describe the physical and/ or human characteristics of places.
1.2.3 Describe how location, weather, and physical environment affect the way people live, including the effects on their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation.
1.4 Students compare and contrast everyday life in different times and places around the world
and recognize that some aspects of people, places, and things change over time while
others stay the same.
1.4.2 Study transportation methods of earlier days.
1.4.3 Recognize similarities and differences of earlier generations in such areas as work (inside and outside the home), dress, manners, stories, games, and festivals, drawing from biographies, oral histories, and folklore.

2nd Grade

2.1 Students differentiate between things that happened long ago and things that happened
yesterday.
2.4 Students understand basic economic concepts and their individual roles in the economy and
demonstrate basic economic reasoning skills.
2.4.1 Describe food production and consumption long ago and today, including the roles of farmers, processors, distributors, weather, and land and water resources.


Animals of the West
History Social Science

Kindergarten

K.1 Students understand that being a good citizen involves acting in certain ways.
K.1.1 Follow rules, such as sharing and taking turns, and know the consequences of breaking them.
K.6 Students understand that history relates to events, people, and places of other times.
K.6.3 Understand how people lived in earlier times and how their lives would be different today (e.g., getting water from a well, growing food, making clothing, having fun, forming organizations, living by rules and laws).

1st Grade

1.2 Students compare and contrast the absolute and relative locations of places and people and
describe the physical and/or human characteristics of places.
1.2.4 Describe how location, weather, and physical environment affect the way people live, including the effects on their food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and recreation.

2nd Grade

2.1 Students differentiate between things that happened long ago and things that happened
yesterday.
2.4 Students understand basic economic concepts and their individual roles in the economy and
demonstrate basic economic reasoning skills.
2.4.1 Describe food production and consumption long ago and today, including the roles of farmers, processors, distributors, weather, and land and water resources.


Animals of the West
Science

Kindergarten

2. Different types of plants and animals inhabit the earth. As a basis for understanding this
concept:
2a Students know how to observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of plants and animals (e.g., seed-bearing plants, birds, fish, insects).
2c Students know how to identify major structures of common plants and animals (e.g., stems, leaves, roots, arms, wings, legs).

1st Grade

2. Plants and animals meet their needs in different ways. As a basis for understanding this
concept:
2a Students know different plants and animals inhabit different kinds of environments and have external features that help them thrive in different kinds of places.
2c Students know animals eat plants or other animals for food and may also use plants or even other animals for shelter and nesting.
2d Students know how to infer what animals eat from the shapes of their teeth (e.g., sharp teeth: eats meat; flat teeth: eats plants).


The California Gold Rush
History Social Science

3rd Grade

3.3 Students draw from historical and community resources to organize the sequence of local
historical events and describe how each period of settlement left its mark on the land.
3.3.1 Describe the economies established by settlers and their influence on the present-day economy, with emphasis on the importance of private property and entrepreneurship.
3.5 Students demonstrate basic economic reasoning skills and an understanding of the economy
of the local region.
3.5.2 Understand that individual economic choices involve trade-offs and the evaluation of benefits and costs.

4th Grade

4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the establishment
of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the Gold Rush, and the
granting of statehood.
4.3.2 Compare how and why people traveled to California and the routes they traveled (e.g., James Beckwourth, John Bidwell, John C. Fremont, Pio Pico).
4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).
4.4 Students explain how California became an agricultural and industrial power, tracing the transformation of the California economy and its political and cultural development since the 1850s.
4.4.2 Explain how the Gold Rush transformed the economy of California, including the types of products produced and consumed, changes in towns (e.g., Sacramento, San Francisco), and economic conflicts between diverse groups of people.
4.4.3 Discuss immigration and migration to California between 1850 and 1900, including the diverse composition of those who came; the countries of origin and their relative locations; and conflicts and accords among the diverse groups (e.g., the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act).

5th Grade

5.8 Students trace the colonization, immigration, and settlement patterns of the American people
from 1789 to the mid-1800s, with emphasis on the role of economic incentives, effects of the physical and political geography, and transportation systems.
5.8.2 Discuss the experiences of settlers on the overland trails to the West (e.g., location of the routes; purpose of the journeys; the influence of the terrain, rivers, vegetation, and climate; life in the territories at the end of these trails).


Westward Expansion
History Social Science

4th Grade

4.4 Students explain how California became an agricultural and industrial power, tracing the
transformation of the California economy and its political and cultural development since the 1850s.
4.4.3 Discuss immigration and migration to California between 1850 and 1900, including the
diverse composition of those who came; the countries of origin and their relative
locations; and conflicts and accords among the diverse groups.
4.4.4 Describe rapid American immigration, internal migration, settlement, and the growth of towns and cities (e.g., Los Angeles).

5th Grade

5.8 Students trace the colonization, immigration, and settlement patterns of the American people from 1789 to the mid-1800s, with emphasis on the role of economic incentives, effects of the physical and political geography, and transportation systems.
5.8.1 Discuss the waves of immigrants from Europe between 1789 and 1850 and their modes of transportation into the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys and through the Cumberland Gap (e.g., overland wagons, canals, flatboats, steamboats).
5.8.4 Discuss the experiences of settlers on the overland trails to the West (e.g., location of the routes; purpose of each journey; the influence of the terrain, rivers, vegetation, and climate; life in the territories at the end of these trails).

8th Grade

8.8 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the
mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
8.8.2 Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives associated with westward expansion, including the concept of Manifest Destiny (e.g., the Lewis and Clark expedition, accounts of the removal of Indians, the Cherokees’ “Trail of Tears,” settlement of the Great Plains) and the territorial acquisitions that spanned numerous decades.


California’s First Peoples
History Social Science

3rd Grade

3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and use maps, tables, graphs, photographs, and charts to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context.
3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes).
3.12 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline).
3.2 Students describe the American Indian nations in their local region long ago and in the recent past.
3.2.1 Describe national identities, religious beliefs, customs, and various folklore traditions.
3.2.2 Discuss the ways in which physical geography, including climate, influenced how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment (e.g., how they obtained food, clothing, tools).
3.2.3 Describe the economy and systems of government, particularly those with tribal constitutions, and their relationship to federal and state governments.

4th Grade

4.1 Students demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic features that define places and regions in California.
4.1.3 Identify the state capital and describe the various regions of California, including how their characteristics and physical environments (e.g., water, landforms, vegetation, climate) affect human activity.
4.1.4 Identify the locations of the Pacific Ocean, rivers, valleys, and mountain passes and explain their effects on the growth of towns.
4.1.5 Use maps, charts, and pictures to describe how communities in California vary in land use, vegetation, wildlife, climate, population density, architecture, services, and transportation.
4.2 Students describe the social, political, cultural, and economic life and interactions among people of California from the pre-Columbian societies to the Spanish mission and Mexican rancho periods.
4.2.1 Discuss the major nations of California Indians, including their geographic distribution, economic activities, legends, and religious beliefs; and describe how they depended on, adapted to, and modified the physical environment by cultivation of land and use of sea resources.

5th Grade

5.1 Students describe the major pre-Columbian settlements, including the cliff dwellers and
Pueblo people of the desert Southwest, the American Indians of the Pacific Northwest, the
nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River.
5.1.1 Describe how geography and climate influenced the way various nations lived and adjusted to the natural environment, including locations of villages, the distinct structures that they built, and how they obtained food, clothing, tools, and utensils.

6th Grade

6.1 Students describe what is known through archaeological studies of the early physical and cultural development of humankind from the Paleolithic era to the agricultural revolution.
6.1.1 Describe the hunter-gatherer societies, including the development of tools and the use of fire.
6.1.2 Identify the locations of human communities that populated the major regions of the world and describe how humans adapted to a variety of environments.
6.3.3 Discuss the climatic changes and human modifications of the physical environment that gave rise to the domestication of plants and animals and new sources of clothing and shelter.


California’s First Peoples
Science

3rd Grade

3. Adaptations in physical structure or behavior may improve an organism’s chance for
survival. As a basis for understanding this concept:
3b Students know examples of diverse life forms in different environments, such as oceans, deserts, tundra, forests, grasslands, and wetlands.
3c Students know living things cause changes in the environment in which they live: some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms, and some are beneficial.
3d Students know when the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce, others die or move to new locations, and that some of those resembled others that are alive today.

4th Grade

3. Living organisms depend on one another and on their environment for survival. As a basis
for understanding this concept:
3a Students know ecosystems can be characterized by their living and nonliving components.
3b Students know that in any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.


Art of the West
History Social Science

8th Grade

8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
8.6.7 Identify common themes in American art as well as transcendentalism and individualism (e.g., writings about and by Ralph  Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Herman Melville, Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow).

10th Grade

10.3 Students analyze the effects of the Industrial Revolution in England, France, Germany,
Japan, and the United States.
10.3.7 Describe the emergence of Romanticism in art and literature (e.g., the poetry of William Blake and William Wordsworth), social criticism (e.g., the novels of Charles Dickens), and the move away from Classicism in Europe.


Art of the West
Visual Arts

6th Grade

ARTISTIC PERCEPTION
1.0 Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations.
Develop Perceptual Skills and Visual Arts Vocabulary  
1.2 Discuss works of art as to theme, genre, style, idea, and differences in media. 
1.3 Describe how artists can show the same theme by using different media and styles.
AESTHETIC VALUING
4.0 Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.
DERIVE MEANING
4.1 Construct and describe plausible interpretations of what they perceive in works of art.
4.2 Identify and describe ways in which their culture is being reflected in current works of art.

7th Grade

ARTISTIC PERCEPTION
1.0 Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts
Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations.
Analyze Art Elements and Principles of Design
1.3 Identify and describe the ways in which artists convey the illusion of space (e.g., placement, overlapping, relative size, atmospheric perspective, and linear perspective).
HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
3.0 Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts
Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.
Diversity of the Visual Arts
3.2  Compare and contrast works of art from various periods, styles, and cultures and explain how those works reflect the society in which they were made.

AESTHETIC VALUING
4.0 Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts
Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.
Make Informed Judgments
4.3 Take an active part in a small-group discussion about the artistic value of specific works of art, with a wide range of the viewpoints of peers being considered.

CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS
5.0 Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers
Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to the visual arts.
Visual Literacy
5.3 Examine art, photography, and other two- and three-dimensional images, comparing how different visual representations of the same object lead to different interpretations of its meaning, and describe or illustrate the results.

8th Grade

ARTISTIC PERCEPTION
Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts
Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations.

HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
3.0 Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts
Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.
Role and Development of the Visual Arts
3.1 
Examine and describe or report on the role of a work of art created to make a social comment or protest social conditions.
Diversity of the Visual Arts
3.4 
Discuss the contributions of various immigrant cultures to the art of a particular society.

AESTHETIC VALUING
4.0 Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts
Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.
Derive Meaning
4.1 
Define their own points of view and investigate the effects on their interpretation of art from cultures other than their own.
4.2 Develop a theory about the artist’s intent in a series of works of art, using reasoned statements to support personal opinions.
4.3 Construct an interpretation of a work of art based on the form and content of the work.


9th 12th Grade—Proficient

ARTISTIC PERCEPTION
Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts. 
Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations.

HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
3.0 Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts
Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.

ROLE AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE VISUAL ARTS
3.1 Identify similarities and differences in the purposes of art created in selected cultures.

DIVERSITY OF THE VISUAL ARTS
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.

AESTHETIC VALUING
4.0 Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts
Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.

DERIVE MEANING
4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.
4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected    over time because of changes in interpretation and context.

MAKE INFORMED JUDGMENTS
4.3 Formulate and support a position regarding the aesthetic value of a specific work of   art and change or defend that position after considering the views of others.

9th 12th Grade—Advanced

HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT
3.0 Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts
Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.

AESTHETIC VALUING
4.0 Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts
Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own,
according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.

DERIVE MEANING
4.3 Analyze and articulate how society influences the interpretation and message of a work of art.

CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS
5.0 Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers
Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to the visual arts.

VISUAL LITERACY
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying     psychological content found in the symbols and images.


Native Americans of the Great Plains: Changes in Culture and Identity
History Social Science

8th Grade

8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
8.12.2 Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.


Windows on the West
History Social Science

3rd Grade

3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and use maps, tables, graphs, photographs, and charts to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context.
3.1.2 Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline).
3.2 Students describe the American Indian nations in their local region long ago and in the recent past.
3.2.1 Describe national identities, religious beliefs, customs, and various folklore traditions.
3.2.2 Discuss the ways in which physical geography, including climate, influenced how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment (e.g., how they obtained food, clothing, tools).

5th Grade

5.1 Students describe the major pre-Columbian settlements, including the cliff dwellers and Pueblo people of the desert Southwest, the American Indians of the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River.
5.1.1 Describe how geography and climate influenced the way various nations lived and adjusted to the natural environment, including locations of villages, the distinct structures that they built, and how they obtained food, clothing, tools, and utensils.
5.1.2 Describe their varied customs and folklore traditions.


Living History: The Casa de Adobe Program
History Social Science

4.2 Students describe the social, political, cultural, and economic life and interactions among
people of California from the pre-Columbian societies to the Spanish mission and Mexican rancho periods.
4.2.3 Describe the Spanish exploration and colonization of California, including the relationships among soldiers, missionaries, and Indians (e.g., Juan Crespi, Junipero Serra, Gaspar de Portola).
4.2.4 Describe the mapping of, geographic basis of, and economic factors in the placement and function of the Spanish missions; and understand how the mission system expanded the influence of Spain and Catholicism throughout New Spain and Latin America.
4.2.5 Describe the daily lives of the people, native and nonnative, who occupied the presidios, missions, ranchos, and pueblos.
4.2.6 Discuss the role of the Franciscans in changing the economy of California from a hunter-gatherer economy to an agricultural economy.
4.2.7 Describe the effects of the Mexican War for Independence on Alta California, including its effects on the territorial boundaries of North America.
4.2.8 Discuss the period of Mexican rule in California and its attributes, including land grants, secularization of the missions, and the rise of the rancho economy.


Journeys Gallery Tour
History Social Science

8th Grade

8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
8.6.1 Discuss the influence of industrialization and technological developments on the region, including human modification of the landscape and how physical geography shaped human actions (e.g., growth of cities, deforestation, farming, mineral extraction).
8.6.2 Outline the physical obstacles to and the economic and political factors involved in building a network of roads, canals, and railroads (e.g., Henry Clay’s American System).
8.6.3 List the reasons for the wave of immigration from Northern Europe to the United States and describe the growth in the number, size, and spatial arrangements of cities (e.g., Irish immigrants and the Great Irish Famine).
8.8 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
8.8.1 Discuss the election of Andrew Jackson as president in 1828, the importance of Jacksonian democracy, and his actions as president (e.g., the spoils system, veto of the National Bank, policy of Indian removal, opposition to the Supreme Court).
8.8.2 Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives associated with westward expansion, including the concept of Manifest Destiny (e.g., the Lewis and Clark expedition, accounts of the removal of Indians, the Cherokees’ “Trail of Tears,” settlement of the Great Plains) and the territorial acquisitions that spanned numerous decades.
8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
8.12.1 Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.
8.12.2 Explain how states and the federal government encouraged business expansion through tariffs, banking, land grants, and subsidies.

Educational Programs at the Autry are sponsored by:

  • The Ahmanson Foundation
  • Capital Group Companies Foundation
  • Dwight Stuart Youth Fund
  • The Georgina-Fredrick Children’s Foundation
  • Hearst Foundations
  • The Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation
  • Northrop Grumman
  • Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California
  • The Sheri and Les Biller Family Foundation
  • Sony Pictures Entertainment
  • U.S. Bank Foundation